/Student Life

ASCIM 2018 Annual Student Conference for Integrative Medicine UCLA

By | 2018-06-14T23:54:05+00:00 March 2nd, 2018|Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (AOM), MATCM, News, Student Life, YSU in the Community|

 

YSU students and staff were excited to talk with eager members of the integrative community on Saturday at UCLA. Thank you all who made this conference a success.

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Dean of DAOM Program Appointment

By | 2018-06-14T23:54:05+00:00 September 13th, 2016|Bulletin, DAOM, News, Student Life, Students & Faculty, University Advancement|

Yo San University is pleased to announce the appointment of

Dr. Laraine Crampton, DAOM, L.Ac as Dean of the University’s DAOM Program.

Dr. Crampton received her MATCM and DAOM degrees from Yo San University, where she has served as a faculty member for the past 22 years. She has been the Chair of the MATCM Qi Cultivation department from 2007, and has been the interim Dean in the DAOM program since April 2016

A seasoned clinician with special interest in Longevity and Internal Medicine, Dr. Crampton has had a private acupuncture practice in Santa Monica, CA for 18 years, where she enjoys caring for multi-generations families. She came to TCM from a background in professional writing, media production and education, including serving as adjunct professor in the USC School of Business Administration.

Dr. Crampton can be reached at 310.577.3000 ext 115, or via email at lcrampton@yosan.edu.

Please join me in welcoming Dr. Crampton to the YSU team.

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Traditional Chinese Medicine

By | 2018-06-14T23:54:05+00:00 July 22nd, 2016|Fitness & Exercise, Student Life, Taoism & Qi Cultivation, YSU Community Clinic|

When you hear someone talking about “Traditional Chinese Medicine” you probably think about acupuncture, or how much needles freak you out. And while acupuncture is a big part of TCM, there are many other aspects that make up the medicine. In today’s “In Caring Hands” we’re highlighting four practices within Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Tai Chi

Tai chi is a centuries-old mind and body practice. It involves gentle, dance-like body movements with mental focus, breathing, and relaxation.

Cupping

Cupping therapy is an ancient form of therapy in which a local suction is created on the skin; practitioners believe this mobilizes blood flow in order to promote healing. Suction is created using heat (fire) or mechanical devices (hand or electrical pumps).

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a technique in which practitioners stimulate specific points on the body—most often by inserting thin needles through the skin.

Herbs

The Chinese Materia Medica (a pharmacological reference book used by TCM practitioners) describes thousands of medicinal substances—primarily plants, but also some minerals and animal products. Different parts of plants, such as the leaves, roots, stems, flowers, and seeds, are used. In TCM, herbs are often combined in formulas and given as teas, capsules, liquid extracts, granules, or powders.

Interested in learning more about TCM?  Follow us on Facebook for up to date news articles about the medicine! You can also see if Traditional Chinese Medicine is right for you by making an appointment at the YSU Blount Community Clinic OR by checking out our “In your Element” community classes series. Right now we’re featuring Andrew Eng’s Hip Hop Qi Gong!

Traditional Chinese Medicine: In Depth – information from the National Center for Complementary Medicine and Integrative Health
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Professional Development

By | 2018-06-14T23:54:05+00:00 July 22nd, 2016|Student Life, YSU Community Clinic|

In their journey to becoming an acupuncturist, students must learn the importance of strong business skills. Yo San University offers several opportunities to further expand students’ professional development, some of which include, Clinic Interning, attending YSU’s monthly “Tao of Success” Program, participating in YSUSA and becoming a Student Ambassador.

A major part of students’ training at YSU is their time in the Clinic. Not only are they getting firsthand experience on treating patients, they are also learning how to create meaningful relationships to ensure return patients.

In spring of 2015, YSU began the “Tao of Success” Program, a speaker series designed to provide YSU students and alumni with insights and inspirations for their career paths. Topics range from digital marketing to networking tips to personal brand management and more.

The Yo San University Student Association (YSUSA) provides a platform for students to formulate and initiate projects internal and external to the University. Officers of the YSUSA, elected annually, communicate with the Administration as the voice of the student body.

The YSU Ambassador Program is a select group of current students who represent the University at outreach events for admissions, University advancement, the YSU Community Clinic and other important functions. The Ambassadors are the face of Yo San, capable of representing the University to the public, prospective students and donors, and alumni.

Students’ professional development and growth helps them not only prepare for the future but also give the highest level of care to their patients.

Join us and alumna Alyssa Dazet on July 17th for her Three Essentials for Practice Success: What You Don’t Learn in Acupuncture School, to learn the three essentials for practice success! Three CEU Hours will be offered.

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Our Community

By | 2018-06-14T23:54:06+00:00 July 8th, 2016|Student Life, YSU Community Clinic|

For many, the first word that comes to mind when thinking about Yo San University is “community.” Since opening its doors in 1989, YSU has given its students a compassionate environment, one where they are able to live out their passions. With that strong sense of community in place, YSU has been able to build a platform for student success with programs such as The White Coat Ceremony, Tao of Success and Tao of Academic Success.

It is amazing to see how our sense of community has expanded beyond the classroom walls. Through partnerships with Being Alive, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Venice Family Clinic, WISE & Healthy Aging and The Wellness Center, as well as in our own clinic, YSU has been able to serve the greater Los Angeles community.

We are always looking for new ways to inspire the next generation of healers. And are excited to see what the future holds for our community, as well as the TCM community.

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The Life of a Canadian Yo San Post Grad by Adam Cappuccino

By | 2018-06-14T23:54:06+00:00 October 24th, 2015|Student Life, TCM Today|

The province of British Columbia, which I now call my home, holds their licensing exam only once a year, unlike CALE which is held twice. Furthermore, the process here consists of two separate exams, a written multiple choice exam and an open-answer clinical exam. There are also several levels of licensing. One can either be an herbalist or an acupuncturist, or one can write the Practitioner’s exam, which incorporates both aspects, and then there is the Doctor level.

Congratulations to the class of Yo San 2014! Two thousand miles north of you guys, on an island called Salt Spring off the coast of Vancouver, I gave up my thoughts to those people who used to be my schoolmates. Having rushed through the program at Yo San myself, I walked the year before some of my classmates. It seemed very important at that time that I got in and out as soon as possible, you see, being Canadian in Los Angeles on Visa, far from family, friends, and my comfort zone. It may surprise some of you to hear that I am not yet in practice. The province of British Columbia, which I now call my home, holds their licensing exam only once a year, unlike CALE which is held twice. Furthermore, the process here consists of two separate exams, a written multiple choice exam and an open-answer clinical exam. There are also several levels of licensing. One can either be an herbalist or an acupuncturist, or one can write the Practitioner’s exam, which incorporates both aspects, and then there is the Doctor level. Our curriculum at Yo San has prepared me for this final level of licensing, but I had to first complete the Practitioner’s exam level. I am happy to report I have passed both, but I do not know if I will pursue the doctor title this year or next. But this lengthy process was to expected. Not having gone to school here, I had no one to help me with all the logistics of applying for exams, the timing involved, the details. And there are no study guides, only an general outline of all the topics covered on the exam. There is definitely a market for Herb Boy or Linda’s notes up here, except that there are more herbs and formulas on the exam. Oh, and they call exterior attacks EPI’s, for external pathogenic factors. And the safety course was via mail-order CD-ROM, not compatible with my Mac, and an online assessment. Luckily I met someone here who was also writing the exam, so things eventually got easier, and I got it all done.

So what have I been doing this whole time? How did I brush up for these exams while out of school for so long? How do I feel about finally being able to start practising soon? I picked up where I left off before deciding to become a TCM healer. I work at a plant nursery, I talk to people about their gardens, I sell them beautiful flowers and trees and have immersed myself back into the botanical world I loved so much, all the while reviewing my herb cards and diagnosing on the fly, of course! It was a long year, but it was a yin period for me, a readjustment and a return to who I was, as a way of establishing who I am now. I think this is an important part of finishing school and starting up real life. This is the longest I’ve ever been outside of academia since I started kindergarten, so it was frightening, but I found my foundation in the familiarity of other aspects of my life. Just now they’re interwoven and fused with TCM. So I consider the yin and yang of one shrub compared to the next. I talk to customers about the tastes and temperatures of vegetables and herbs they are growing, and how to stretch for their back pain. And I always let them know that I am in the process of obtaining my license here and that I’ll make my big splash once the opportune moment arrises. Until that time, I find comfort in the forests, my garden, and the flow of Life around me. I say, don’t make your whole life about school, but don’t exclude what you learn at Yo San from everything else that happens in your life.

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YSU earned the highest passage rate among all schools for the August 2015 California Acupuncture Licensing Exam!

By | 2018-06-14T23:54:06+00:00 October 23rd, 2015|Achievements, Alumni, MATCM, News, Student Life, University Advancement|

We are very pleased to congratulate the August 2015 California Acupuncture Licensing Exam (CALE) test-takers who have elevated Yo San University to 1st among all schools in passage rate! Our first-time takers led the way among their peers with a 92% pass rate, and YSU was also 1st overall, which includes both first-time and repeating takers.

While this achievement is due to the individual efforts of our graduates, YSU has a long track-record of performing among the top three schools for overall CALE results on a year-to-year basis. I also want to acknowledge the extra workshops our Academic Affairs team initiated to help prepare for the August exam.

Ultimately, our faculty, staff and Board of Trustees have a single purpose: to support individual and organizational excellence. This month, we have been ranked top in academic performance, as well as clinical reputation. We should all be proud to be a part of YSU.

Congratulations to our August CALE takers!  You can review the entire list here.

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