Entry-level Degrees in Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine

Master's and Doctorate Programs for Future TCM Practitioners

Master of Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine (MAcCHM)

The Master's program (MAcCHM) is a comprehensive graduate program designed to lead students to the level of knowledge and clinical proficiency necessary to become a successful independent health-care provider. The MAcCHM program emphasizes hands-on clinical training with theoretical study and a rich 38-generation family heritage of Qi cultivation and development, creating a strong foundation for a career as an acupuncturist.

Duration: 4 years (191 units / 3375 Hours)
Admission Requirements: 60 semester credits
Program Highlights: entry level training, meets the requirements for State licensing and National certification exams.
Program Tuition: $71,894 estimated for students who are not transferring credits.
Financial Aid: Yo San Scholarships, Federal Aid, Veteran Benefits, Work/Study, Installment Payments
Other Degree Names: Entry level Master's degree
Classes held: in-person weekdays and evenings
Course Descriptions: view detailed descriptions of our Master's Degree course content


Doctorate of Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine (DAcCHM)

The First Professional Doctorate (DAcCHM) builds upon our Master's curriculum with an additional focus on integrative medicine and collaborative health care, research literacy, and evidence-informed practices. At a time when acupuncture is an increasingly valued treatment in mainstream care for patient wellness, it is important for acupuncturists to be equipped with the knowledge, communication, and research skills to effectively work with Western medical doctors, physical therapists, and other health-care professionals

Duration: 4 years​ (195 units / 3435 Hours)​ *with co-requisites
4 years (​205 units / 3585 Hours)​ *without co-requisites
Co-Requisites: Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Physics, and Psychology
Program Highlights: entry level training, integrative care, Dr. title, meets the requirements for State licensing and National certification exams.
Admission Requirements: 90 semester credits or 135 quarter credits, biomedicine courses
Program Tuition: $76,849, estimated for students who are not transferring credits.
Financial Aid: Yo San Scholarships, Federal Aid, Veteran Benefits, Work/Study, Installment Payments
Other Degree Names: First Professional Doctorate, Entry level Doctoral degree
Classes held: in-person weekdays and evenings
Advanced Training: Survey of TCM Specialties, Professional Development & System-Based Medicine, Advanced Acupuncture Therapeutics, Research and Evidence-Based Medicine

 

Need Guidance? Compare our four programs here

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Graduates of both our Master's and Doctoral of Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine program are able to:

  • Demonstrate comprehensive understanding of Traditional Chinese Medicine theories and principles.
  • Develop clinical skills to assess patients, diagnose, strategize treatment, and professionally execute Traditional Chinese Medicine techniques.
  • Master the importance of Qi Cultivation and demonstrate competence in applying its diverse techniques effectively.
  • Achieve high passing scores on the national board certification and the California Acupuncture state licensing exams required to become a licensed acupuncturist (L.Ac.)
  • Acquire essential abilities for professional practice, effective communication, and collaboration in integrative healthcare settings.
  •  Emphasize ethical conduct and adherence to federal and state legal requirements in acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine practice.

In addition, graduates of our Doctoral of Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine program are able to:

  • Collaborate effectively with Western medical doctors, physical therapists, and other health-care professionals.
  • Utilize system-based medicine within hospital care settings
  • Emphasize integrative medicine, combining traditional and modern healthcare approaches.

 

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View our course schedule here


THE FIRST ACADEMIC YEAR

In the first academic year, fundamental principles and theories of all aspects of Traditional Chinese Medicine, acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Pharmacopoeia are introduced. Students will also learn basic biomedical sciences such as Biology, Biochemistry, Human Anatomy & Physiology, and Western Medical Terminology. Concurrent with the Herbal Pharmacopoeia courses, students observe and receive hands-on experience in the Yo San University Clinic Herbal Dispensary. Students will also begin exploring and understanding the foundational concepts in Taoist Studies and Qi Cultivation.

THE SECOND ACADEMIC YEAR

The second year’s classroom experience continues with an in-depth study of the practice of Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine, including subjects such as TCM Diagnosis, Acupuncture Point  Location, Tuina/Acupressure, and Herbal Formulas. Biomedical sciences during the second year include classes such as Clinical Nutrition and Pathophysiology. Students will also continue their studies in Taoism and Qi cultivation.

Through the Clinical Theater course at the end of the second year, students begin their clinical training by observing licensed faculty/practitioners manage real-life clinical patients with the various modalities of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

The First Comprehensive Examination, taken at the end of the second year, serves as a benchmark tool to assess academic progress in the curriculum.

 


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THE THIRD ACADEMIC YEAR

In the third year of the program, students will deepen their knowledge and understanding of both TCM and Western clinical sciences through a series of didactic courses that focus on the clinical aspects of the medicine. Courses will include TCM Internal Medicine, Herbal Formulation Skills, advanced Acupuncture needling techniques, Western Physical Assessment and Clinical Medicine, Western Pharmacology, Laboratory & Radiological Diagnosis, Biomedical Acupuncture, and other clinically-oriented courses to prepare students for their clinical internship.

Third-year students continue to observe and assist clinical faculty and interns in the care and management of patients at the Yo San University Community Clinic. Students will also complete their Clean Needle Technique (CNT) and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) courses in preparation for clinical internship.

On passing the Pre-Clinical examination, usually toward the end of the third year, and fulfilling all the required coursework, students will embark on the final stage of the program: Clinical Internship.

 

THE FOURTH ACADEMIC YEAR

The clinical education component in the program comprises three levels of internship training, with increasing levels of direct participation and responsibilities for patient care and management under the direct supervision of experienced clinical faculty. Intern activities include assessment and examination of patients, formulation of diagnosis and treatment plan, and implementation of treatment with TCM modalities. Students are guided to develop and maintain the highest standards of professionalism and responsibility until such standards become a  fundamental characteristic.

Classroom experience at this stage will be focused on clinical case studies and integrative approaches to TCM, as well as the ethical, legal, business and management aspects of setting up and maintaining a successful acupuncture practice.

For DAcCHM candidates, the fourth year brings Integrative Medicine to the forefront. Students will receive training in research based medicine, integrative diagnosis and practice, advanced herbal studies, and advanced case writing.

 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The two-year DAOM program in integrative Medicine at Yo San University is designed for acupuncturists who are interested in advancing their Traditional Chinese Medicine knowledge and skills, learning the intricacies of a clinical specialization, as well as developing the skills needed to conduct research or participate in research studies. Doctoral candidates have a unique opportunity to study with expert faculty in their chosen clinical specialty.

The University’s innovative DAOM program emphasizes collaboration in clinical settings by providing rigorous training in advanced concepts of TCM and biomedicine, and promoting the dynamic relationship between TCM and Biomedicine. By integrating biomedical science and TCM, the program aims to produce extraordinary practitioners, scholars, teachers and leaders in the field.

The YSU DAOM program is 1,220 hours in length, comprising of 570 didactic hours and 650 clinical hours. DAOM courses are offered once per month during a 3-day weekend intensive with a flexible clinical training schedule, allowing practitioners to earn a doctorate degree in 24 months while maintaining their private practices.

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES

Core curriculum courses are designed to equip doctoral candidates with information, processes, research tools, and perspectives to enrich their specialization studies, to aid in professional development and to enhance professional relationships.

INTEGRATIVE SPECIALTIES

The YSU DAOM program presently offers two (2) specialization options: Healthy Aging & Internal Medicine and/or Women’s Health & Reproductive Medicine. Potential DAOM candidates will be required to select their desired clinical specialty at the time of application for admission to the DAOM program. 

Specialization courses provide doctoral candidates opportunities to acquire advanced knowledge in their chosen clinical specialty over the full two (2) years of the DAOM program. By participating in advanced coursework in TCM and biomedicine, doctoral candidates apply increasingly complex approaches to their specialty study through the integration of specialized curriculum, research findings and clinical experiences. Classes meet during a 3-day weekend every month, comprising 2.5 days of classroom lectures and a half-day of clinical training. 

Healthy Aging & Longevity

Enhance your Traditional Chinese Medicine knowledge and credentials, and gain valuable insight into integrative medicine practices. With continued training and mentorships, you will become an invaluable member of your community healthcare network. Having authored your own original scholarly work detailing your research, you’ll graduate with the confidence to prevent, diagnose and treat a vast array of complex conditions including: Cardiology, Orthopedics, Immunology, Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

Women’s Health & Reproductive Medicine:

This two-year clinical doctorate specialty, the Nation's first, integrates advanced Western and Eastern diagnostics and treatment protocols for the effective management of men’s and women’s reproductive health dysfunctions and disorders. Didactic and clinical instruction highlights the specialized treatment of such conditions as hormonal imbalances, menstrual disorders, endometriosis, infertility, erectile dysfunction, prostate diseases, urological and nutritional disorders, ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage.

ADVANCED Clinical Education

DAOM candidates receive advanced clinical training in their area of specialty by attending the program’s specialty focused clinics and developing individual and customized plans for their clinical training experiences.

Opportunities for externships, mentorships and preceptorships include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Clinical Internships at Yo San University Blount Community Clinic
  • Clinical Externships at specialized clinics and hospitals in the local area
  • China Externships at universities and hospitals in China
  • Mentorship programs with experienced senior practitioners and faculty in the field
  • Preceptorships programs with focus on education or academic administration
  • Specialty grand rounds

 

 

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CURRICULUM, Master's in Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine (MAcCHM)

I. Department of Chinese Medicine (CM)

Course No.Course NameUnitsHours
CM100Chinese Medical Terminology230
CM111TCM Foundational Theories345
CM112Zang-Fu Syndromes345
CM201TCM Diagnosis345
CM202Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis345
CM301TCM Internal Medicine I345
CM302TCM Internal Medicine II345
CM400Survey of TCM Specialties I345
CM411Survey of TCM Specialties II345
CM420TCM Classics I230
CM421TCM Classics II345
31465

II. Department of Acupuncture  (AC)

Course No.Course NameUnitsHours
AC100Intro to Meridian Theory230
AC201Acupuncture I345
AC202Acupuncture II345
AC203Acupuncture III345
AC220Tuina & Acupressure345
AC230Acupuncture Safety & Application115
AC301Acupuncture Techniques I345
AC302Acupuncture Techniques II345
AC310Scalp & Auricular Acupuncture230
AC320Acupuncture Therapeutics I345
AC330Acupuncture Therapeutics II345
PD350Taoist Acupuncture*115
30450

III. Department of Herbal Medicine (HM)

Course No.Course NameUnitsHours
HM100Intro to Chinese Herbal Medicine115
HM110TCM Herbal Materia Medica I345
HM111Herbal Lab I115
HM120TCM Herbal Materia Medica II345
HM121Herbal Lab II115
HM130TCM Herbal Materia Medica III345
HM131Herbal Lab III115
HM210TCM Herbal Formulas I345
HM220TCM Herbal Formulas II345
HM230TCM Herbal Formulas III345
HM240TCM Nutrition230
HM310Herbal Formula Construction230
HM320TCM Herbal Patent & External Medicines230
PD360Herbal Pharmacognosy*115
PD370Herbal Safety & Drug Interactions*115
30450

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IV. Department of Western Medicine (WM)

Pre-Clinical Biological Sciences (co-requisites)

WM110General Biology230
WM120General Chemistry230
WM130Biochemistry for Health Sciences230
WM140Physics for Health Sciences230
WM160General Psychology230

Western Medicine

Course No.Course NameUnitsHours
WM100Western Medical Terminology230
WM150Topographical Anatomy115
WM151Anatomy & Physiology I345
WM152Anatomy & Physiology II345
WM153Anatomy & Physiology III345
WM211Pathology / Pathophysiology I345
WM212Pathology / Pathophysiology II345
(Excluding co-requisites)18270
(Including co-requisites)28420

Clinical Biomedicine

Course No.Course NameUnitsHours
WM220Western Clinical Nutrition345
WM310Western Physical Assessment345
WM321Western Clinical Medicine I345
WM322Western Clinical Medicine II345
WM330Medical Imaging & Laboratory Diagnosis230
WM340Mental Wellness & Patient Care Psychology230
WM350Survey of Health Professionals115
WM360Western Pharmacology345
WM370Biomedical Acupuncture115
21315

Professional Development & System-Based Medicine

Course No.Course NameUnitsHours
WM230History of Medicine230
WM420Principles of Public Health230
WM431Healthcare Laws & Ethics115
WM432Healthcare Business Management230
PD210Medical Writing & Communication Skills*230
PD340Research & Evidence Based Medicine*230
PD410Integrative Medicine I – Overview of Patient Care Systems*230
PD420Integrative Medicine II – Emergency Care & Procedures*230
PD430Integrative Medicine III – Emerging Collaborative Care Paradigm*230
PD450Patient Education & Counseling*115
PD500First Aid & CPR00
18270

*required for DAcCHM

VI. Clinical Education

CL100Intro to Clinical Patient Care230
CL310Clinical Theater (1 unit each / 2 units required)2*60
CL400Clinical Observation (1 unit each / 3 units required)3*90
CL600Clinical Internship – Level I10*300
CL611Integrative Case Studies I115
CL700Clinical Internship – Level II8*240
CL711Integrative Case Studies II115
CL800Clinical Internship – Level III8*240
CL811Integrative Case Studies III115
CL880Clinical Externship1*60
Didactic575
Clinical32990
*Clinical unitsTotal1065

VII. Department of Taoist Studies and Qi Cultivation

Course No.Course NameUnitsHours
TO100Taoism I: Principles & Foundation115
TO200Taoism II: Natural Healing115
TO300Taoism III: The Healthcare Practitioner115
QC110Self-Healing Qigong115
QC120Eight Treasures Qigong115
QC130Harmony Taijiquan115
QC140Infinichi Qigong115
QC150Dao-In Qigong Level 1115
9135
MAcCHM PROGRAM TOTAL
Total units required for graduation191 units
Didactic Units158 units
Clinical Units32 units
Total hours of Program(including co-requisite courses)3,375 hours
DAcCHM PROGRAM TOTAL
Total units required for graduation205 units
Didactic Units172 units
Clinical Units32 units
Total hours of Program(including co-requisite courses)
3,585 hours

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Bita Yadidi

This place is very special and magical. I feel very blessed and grateful to be able to receive this kind of medicine. And also the Ni family, 38 generations and getting that transmitted to us, that ancient wisdom that we seem to forget. I’m grateful to receive that.

Bita Yadidi, L.Ac. Yo San University Doctoral Student

Questions? Reach Out to Yo San University !

Course Descriptions
Yo San University MAcCHM / DAcCHM Program


CHINESE MEDICINE

CHINESE MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

CM 100 • 2 Units • 30 Hours
This course familiarizes students with basic Chinese medical language and terminology. Prerequisites: None

TCM FOUNDATIONAL THEORIES

CM 111 • 3 Units • 45 Hours
This is the first of a three-part series that presents the fundamental theories and concepts of Traditional Chinese Medicine. This course begins with the theories of Yin and Yang, Five elements, Vital Substances, Zang-Fu and Channels and Collaterals. This course will also explore the etiology of disease in Traditional Chinese Medicine, along with the basic concepts of diagnostic investigation & treatment theory. Prerequisites: None

ZANG-FU SYNDROMES

CM 112 • 3 Units • 45 Hours
This is the second of a three-part series that presents the fundamental theories and concepts of Traditional Chinese Medicine. This module focuses on pattern identification based on Zang-Fu syndrome differentiation. Students will learn to recognize and identify basic signs and symptoms of disease patterns based on various Zang-Fu syndromes. Prerequisites: TCM Foundational Theories

TCM DIAGNOSIS

CM 201 • 3 Units • 45 Hours
This first section of the two-part series on TCM Diagnosis focuses on the “Four Diagnostic Methods” of Observation, Smelling/ Hearing, Inquiry and Palpation. Each diagnostic method will be explored in detail, with time allocated for in-class practice of the appropriate diagnostic modality. Beginning with an introduction to the basic skills and theories of traditional diagnosis using the four examinations, this two-part series covers a broad range of topics related to the traditional Chinese medical diagnosis and prepares students for the clinical aspects of the curriculum. Prerequisites: TCM Foundational Theories; Zang-Fu Syndromes; Chinese Medical Terminology

ADVANCED TCM SYNDROME DIAGNOSIS

CM 202 • 3 Units • 45 Hours
The second of a two-part series on diagnostic methods in TCM, the emphasis of this course is on TCM diagnosis integrating various clinical signs and symptoms, and the formulation of differential diagnoses based of clinical signs and symptoms. Students will also be introduced to TCM pediatric diagnosis, as well as pattern identification based on the Four Levels, Six Stages, Triple Burner, Eight Extraordinary Vessels, and Five Elements. Prerequisites: TCM Foundational Theories

TCM INTERNAL MEDICINE I

CM 301 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This is the first of a two-part series that examines in detail common disorders from a TCM perspective. Students will study in detail the signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment principles as well as the acupuncture and herbal treatments for various respiratory, digestive and urogenital disorders. Prerequisites: Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis; TCM Herbal Formulas I, II & III; Acupuncture Point Therapeutics I or II

TCM INTERNAL MEDICINE II

CM 302 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This is the second of a two-part series that examines in detail common disorders from a TCM perspective. Students will study in detail the signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment principles as well as the acupuncture and herbal treatments for various disorders of the musculoskeletal, neurological, metabolic and cardiovascular systems. Prerequisites: Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis; TCM Herbal Formulas I, II & III; Acupuncture Point

SURVEY OF TCM SPECIALTIES I

CM 400 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course provides a survey of common diseases encountered in the following TCM specializations: Gynecology, Pediatrics, Dermatology, Neurology & Geriatrics. Prerequisites: Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis; Herbal Formulas I, II & III; Acupuncture Point Therapeutics I & II

SURVEY OF TCM SPECIALTIES II

CM 411 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This is the second of 2 courses that provide a survey of common diseases encountered in the various TCM specializations. Part 2 covers common clinical conditions in: Orthopedics & Traumatology, Ophthalmology, Ear Nose & Throat, Family medicine & general care, as well as introduction to TCM emergency care. Prerequisites: Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis; Herbal Formulas I, II & III; Acupuncture Point Therapeutics I & II

SURVEY OF TCM CLASSICS I

CM 401 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course presents an introduction to the major TCM doctrines and schools of thoughts, focusing on significant TCM classic works/texts including the Huang Di Nei Jin (Yellow Emperor’s Inner Classics), Jin Gui Yao Lue (Essential Prescriptions from the Golden Cabinet) and other major TCM works/texts. By understanding these concepts and doctrines, the students will gain a deeper understanding of the formation and development of TCM theories and practices. Prerequisites: Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis; Herbal Formulas I, II & III; Acupuncture Point Therapeutics I & II

SURVEY OF TCM CLASSICS II

CM 402 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course presents an introduction to the major TCM herbal doctrines and schools of thoughts, focusing on Shang Han Lun, Jin Gui Yao Lue and Wen Bing. By understanding these concepts and doctrines, the students will gain a deeper understanding of the formation and development of TCM herbal theories and practices. Prerequisites: Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis; Herbal Formulas I, II & III; Acupuncture Point Therapeutics I & II

ACUPUNCTURE

INTRODUCTION TO MERIDIAN THEORY

AC 100 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course familiarizes students with the concepts of channels and meridians and presents a survey of the 12 primary and 8 extraordinary meridians and the various pathways and collaterals associated with each meridian. It also presents the traditional system of proportional measurement combined with anatomical landmarks as a guide for locating points along a pathway. Prerequisites: None

ACUPUNCTURE I

AC 201 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This is the first of a three-part series that examines in detail the location of acupuncture points. This module focuses on the Lung, Large Intestine, Stomach, Spleen, Heart and Small Intestine meridians. The specific functions and energetics of major points along these channels will also be examined in detail. Prerequisites: Anatomy & Physiology I, Intro to Meridians

ACUPUNCTURE II

AC 202 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course continues to examine in detail the location and energetics of acupuncture points. This module presents acupuncture points along the Urinary Bladder, Kidney, Pericardium, Triple Burner, and Gall Bladder meridians. Prerequisites: Anatomy & Physiology I, Intro to Meridians

ACUPUNCTURE III

AC 203 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

The third of a three-part series on acupuncture point location and energetics. This course covers the location of acupuncture points on the Liver, Governing (Du) and Conception (Ren) meridians; it also describes in detail various ‘extra points’ commonly used in acupuncture and TCM. Students will also learn the energetics of group points including the Front-mu, Back-shu, Confluent, Influential and group Luo points. Prerequisites: Anatomy & Physiology I, Intro to Meridians

TUINA / ACUPRESSURE

AC 220 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course covers therapeutic massage and soft tissue manipulation within the scope of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The course includes theory and application of Tuina, indications for massage therapy; development of the student’s ability to apply manipulation methods and the study of clinical applications of Tuina for common diseases. Prerequisites: Intro to Meridians

ACUPUNCTURE TECHNIQUES I

AC 301 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course presents lectures, demonstrations, and practice in safe needling techniques, advanced acupuncture techniques and details of acupuncture modalities. The course begins by introducing the basic components of clean needling technique and needle safety. Discussions of acupuncture treatment by evaluating the spectrum of treatment options available to the acupuncturist, will take place. Instructions in acupuncture needling techniques will include point location and palpation as an integral aspect of needling, coupled with an analytical and practical inquiry into the concept of Qi and how it relates to needling technique. Acupuncture modalities such as moxibustion, gua sha and cupping will be covered. Prerequisites: Acupuncture I, II & III; TCM Foundational Theories; Zang-Fu Syndromes

ACUPUNCTURE TECHNIQUES II

AC 302 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course presents lectures, demonstrations, and practice in safe needling techniques, advanced acupuncture techniques and details of acupuncture modalities. The course begins by introducing the basic components of clean needling technique and needle safety. Discussions of acupuncture treatment by evaluating the spectrum of treatment options available to the acupuncturist, will take place. Instructions in acupuncture needling techniques will include point location and palpation as an integral aspect of needling, coupled with an analytical and practical inquiry into the concept of Qi and how it relates to needling technique. Details on various acupuncture modalities, including advanced needle techniques, plum blossom, dermal needles, bleeding cupping, electro-acupuncture, ultrasound, cold and heat treatments, and the use of adjunctive acupoint stimulation devices including magnets and beads will be discussed. The course will also include discussions on equipment maintenance and safety. Prerequisites: Acupuncture I, II & III; TCM Foundational Theories; Zang-Fu Syndromes

AURICULAR & SCALP ACUPUNCTURE

AC 310 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course reviews the methods and clinical application of microsystem acupuncture, focusing on the systems of scalp and auricular acupuncture, integrating lectures, demonstrations, and practice sessions within the course. Prerequisites: Acupuncture Techniques I

ACUPUNCTURE POINT THERAPEUTICS I

AC 320 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course presents the use of acupuncture therapy to treat commonly encountered diseases and conditions. It focuses on disease etiology, pathogenesis, and differentiation from the perspective of both TCM and conventional Western medicine, and the subsequent formulation and selection of appropriate acupuncture point combinations. Students will also gain familiarity with treatment principles and meridian and point selection for each condition. Advanced treatment skills and adjunctive therapies to acupuncture are presented and discussed. Prerequisites: Acupuncture I, II & III; TCM Foundational Theories; Zang-Fu Syndromes

ACUPUNCTURE POINT THERAPEUTICS II

AC 320 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

Part II presents the use of acupuncture therapy to treat commonly encountered diseases and conditions. It focuses on disease etiology, pathogenesis and differentiation from the perspective of both TCM and conventional Western medicine, and the subsequent formulation and selection of acupuncture point combinations. Students will gain familiarity with treatment principles and meridian and point selection for each condition. Advanced treatment skills and adjunctive therapies to acupuncture are presented and discussed in gynecology and pediatrics. Prerequisites: Acupuncture I, II & III; TCM foundational theories; Zang Fu Syndromes

TAOIST ACUPUNCTURE

PD 350 • 1 Units • 15 Hours

This course integrates the natural healing and spiritual aspects of Taoism and Taoist Healing Arts with the principles of acupuncture channel and meridian theories. Topics covered include Taoist Yangsheng (Health Cultivation) acupuncture and moxibustion, Meridian Flow (Zhiwu Liuzhu) and circadian acupuncture and Taoist Spiritual acupuncture. Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Patient Care. *DAcCHM requirement

CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE

INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE

HM 100 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

This course presents a basic and introductory understanding of the concepts and practice of Chinese herbal medicine. The course provides an overview of the fundamental concepts of botany as applied to Chinese Herbal Medicine, concepts of herbal preparation, combination, interactions, properties, contraindication, as well as fundamentals of herb-drug interaction. Students will also be introduced to the Herb Lab policies, procedures, and educational objectives. Prerequisites: None

TCM HERBAL MATERIA MEDICA I

HM 110 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This is the first of a three-part series that examines in detail the herbal characteristics, entering channels, therapeutic actions, clinical indications, contraindications, dosages, preparations and special properties of the major medicinal substances in Chinese herbal medicine. In this module, medicinal substances from the following categories will be studied in detail: herbs that release the exterior, herbs that clear heat, downward draining herbs, herbs that drain damp and aromatic herbs that transform damp. Prerequisites: Introduction to Chinese Herbal Medicine

TCM HERBAL MATERIA MEDICA II

HM 120 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This is the second of a three-part series that examines in detail the herbal characteristics, entering channels, therapeutic actions, clinical indications, contraindications, dosages, preparations and special properties of the major medicinal substances in Chinese herbal medicine. In this module, medicinal substances from the following categories will be studied in detail: herbs that dispel wind-damp, herbs that transform phlegm and stop cough, herbs that relieve food stagnation, digestive, herbs that regulate Qi, herbs that regulate blood and herbs that warm the interior and expel cold. Prerequisites: Introduction to Chinese Herbal Medicine

TCM HERBAL MATERIA MEDICA III

HM 130 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This is the third of a three-part series that examines in detail the herbal characteristics, entering channels, therapeutic actions, clinical indications, contraindications, dosages, preparations and special properties of the major medicinal substances in Chinese herbal medicine. In this module, medicinal substances from the following categories will be studied in detail: tonifying herbs, substances that calm the spirit, herbs that extinguish wind and stop tremors, herbs that stabilize and bind, aromatic substances that open the orifices, herbs that expel parasites and substances for topical application. Prerequisites: Introduction to Chinese Herbal Medicine

HERBAL LAB (3 REQUIRED)

HM 111 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours • 3 REQUIRED (3 Units/45 Hours TOTAL)

This course provides an accessible and interactive environment for students to learn about Chinese herbal medicine in a practical setting to accompany the more didactic Herbal Pharmacopoeia series. Fifteen hours of herb lab are required for each of the three Herbal Pharmacopoeia courses, i.e., a total of three fifteen-hour blocks are required in the entire curriculum (45 hours total). Prerequisites: Concurrent with TCM Herbal Materia Medica I, II & III

TCM HERBAL FORMULAS I

HM 210 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

The first of a three-part series that analyzes in detail herbal composition, formulation strategies, therapeutic actions, clinical indications / contraindications, dosages, and preparation methods of the major Chinese herbal prescriptions. This module focuses on formulas that release exterior, clear heat, harmonize and drain downward. Prerequisites: TCM Herbal Materia Medica I, II & III; TCM Diagnosis.

TCM HERBAL FORMULAS II

HM 220 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

The second of a three-part series that analyzes in detail herbal composition, formulation strategies, therapeutic actions, clinical indications / contraindications, dosages, and preparation methods of the major Chinese herbal prescriptions. This module focuses on formulas that treat dryness, expel dampness, release interior and exterior excess, tonify, regulate Qi, and warm interior cold. Prerequisites: TCM Herbal Materia Medica I, II & III; TCM Diagnosis.

TCM HERBAL FORMULAS III

HM 230 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

The third of a three-part series that analyzes in detail herbal composition, formulation strategies, therapeutic actions, clinical indications / contraindications, dosages, and preparation methods of the major Chinese herbal prescriptions. This module focuses on formulas that regulate blood, stabilize and bind, calm the spirit, open sensory orifices, expel wind, dispel phlegm, reduce food stagnation and expel parasites. Prerequisites: TCM Herbal Materia Medica I, II & III; TCM Diagnosis.

TCM NUTRITION

HM 240 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course presents the TCM properties of foods and the qualitative effects of various food substances on health. The course also discusses the application of Chinese dietetics in daily life, as well as dietary modifications for various clinical disorders and disharmonies. Prerequisites: TCM Herbal Materia Medica I, II & III; TCM Foundational Theories; Zang-Fu Syndromes

HERBAL FORMULA CONSTRUCTION

HM 310 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course focuses on the development of herbal formula writing skills. Students will learn the principles and strategies of herbal combinations and apply these skills and strategies in constructing an herbal formula and modifying formulas to suit the individual needs of their patients. Prerequisites: TCM Herbal Formulas I, II & III; TCM Diagnosis; Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis.

HERBAL PATENT AND EXTERNAL MEDICINES

HM 320 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course presents a survey of various prepackaged patent and external medicines available in the market and looks into clinical efficacy and the prescription and use of these medicinal herbal products. Prerequisites: TCM Herbal Formulas I, II & III; TCM Diagnosis; Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis.

HERBAL PHARMACOGNOSY

PD 360 • 3 Units • 15 Hours

This course identifies and describes principles of pharmacognosy (the knowledge of medicinal plant preparations and extracts) and phytochemistry (literally, ‘plant’ chemistry) as they apply to Chinese Herbal Medicine. The course holistically integrates knowledge base from traditional Western herbal medicine and Chinese herbal medicine, with scientific information from contemporary chemistry, botany, and human physiology. Prerequisites: T C M Herbal Formulas I, II & III; TCM Diagnosis; Advanced TCM Syndrome Diagnosis; Acupuncture Point Therapeutics I & II. *DAcCHM requirement

HERBAL SAFETY AND HERB-DRUG INTERACTIONS

PD 370 • 1 Units • 15 Hours

This course provides the introductory information to recognize the herb-drug interactions among commonly used herbs and drugs. The current understanding of how herbs and drugs interacting are discussed in the context of clinical practice and the available information. Select herbs and drugs are reviewed with an eye to enhancing clinical safety. Contraindicated herb-drug combinations are discussed as well as the evidence for this conclusion.

Prerequisites: TCM Herbal Formulas I, II & III; Pathophysiology I & II. *DAcCHM requirement

PRE-CLINICAL BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

WESTERN MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

WM 100 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of Western medical terminology and nomenclature, including major roots, prefixes, suffixes and derivatives. Prerequisites: None

BIOLOGY

WM 110 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This is an introductory study of life sciences designed as an introduction to the health care sciences.

Prerequisites: None

CHEMISTRY

WM 120 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course presents the fundamentals of inorganic chemistry with emphasis on basic chemical principles and their applications to the health care sciences. Prerequisites: None

BIOCHEMISTRY

WM 130 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This is an introduction to physiological chemistry, including study of the function and structure of the major groups of biochemical compounds, a survey of the main metabolic pathways and an introduction to the biochemical basis of genetics. Prerequisites: Chemistry

PHYSICS

WM 140 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This is an introductory study of the basic principles and concepts in mechanics, electromagnetism, heat and light, and how these physical laws apply to health care sciences. Prerequisites: None

TOPOGRAPHICAL ANATOMY

WM 150 • 1 Unis • 15 Hours

This is the first of a three-part series examining in detail the anatomical structure of the human body. This course presents a comprehensive review of the anatomy of the human musculoskeletal system. Additional emphasis is placed on external anatomical landmarks and the topographical anatomy of internal structures relevant to the location of acupuncture points and acupuncture needling safety. Prerequisites: None

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I

WM 151 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

The course provides a detailed study of human anatomy and physiology, including topographical anatomy as well as the organization of the human body and the musculoskeletal, integumentary systems. Prerequisites: Western Medical Terminology; Biology; Topographical Anatomy (or taken concurrently)

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II

WM 152 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course continues the detailed study of human anatomy and physiology, focusing on the nervous, endocrine, digestive, hematological and respiratory systems. Prerequisites: Anatomy & Physiology I

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY III

WM 153 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course continues the detailed study of human anatomy and physiology, focusing on the cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, urinary and reproductive systems as well as an introductory study of human genetics, growth and development. Prerequisites: Anatomy & Physiology I

PATHOLOGY/PATHOPHYSIOLOGY I

WM 211 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course presents the fundamental mechanisms of disease processes, including cellular and system dysfunctions, inflammation and repair, immune responses and pathological processes in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Prerequisites: Anatomy & Physiology I, II & III; Biochemistry.

PATHOLOGY/PATHOPHYSIOLOGY II

WM 212 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

The pathophysiology series continues with the study of the fundamental mechanisms of disease processes, focusing on disorders of the gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine and neurological systems. Prerequisites: Pathophysiology I

WESTERN CLINICAL SCIENCES

WESTERN NUTRITION

WM 220 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course presents the principles of western nutrition and nutritional assessment. It examines the functions and metabolic pathways of major nutrients, vitamins and minerals, and the diseases associated with an excess and deficiency of these nutrients. Students will also learn to analyze and evaluate a patient’s nutritional intake to identify and treat a variety of commonly encountered conditions. Prerequisites: Biochemistry, Western Medical Terminology, Anatomy & Physiology I, II & III

WESTERN PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT

WM 310 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course will provide students training in the proper techniques of Western diagnostic assessment, including history taking, physical examination and clinical charting. Students will learn the basic techniques in examining the head, neck, thorax and abdomen, as well as basic skills in orthopedic and neurological assessments. Prerequisites: Pathophysiology I & II

WESTERN CLINICAL MEDICINE I

WM 321 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course provides a systematic study of common clinical disorders in neurology, rheumatology, dermatology, musculoskeletal disorders, endocrinology, hematology, immunology and infection diseases. Students will learn the clinical manifestations, etiology, differential diagnosis and diagnostic criteria, as well as basic treatment principles of common diseases in a clinical setting. Prerequisites: Pathophysiology I & II, Western Physical Assessment

WESTERN CLINICAL MEDICINE II

WM 322 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course continues the systematic study of common disorders, focusing on diseases in the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, renal, urogenital, and gynecological systems. Students will learn the clinical manifestations, etiology, differential diagnosis and diagnostic criteria, as well as basic treatment principles of common diseases in a clinical setting. Prerequisites: Pathophysiology I & II, Western Physical Assessment

MEDICAL IMAGING AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS

WM 330 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course provides students with the basic information in interpreting medical imaging data and diagnostic laboratory tests. Students will learn to analyze and correlate radiological and laboratory data with their patients’ clinical diagnoses. Prerequisites: Pathophysiology I & II

MENTAL WELLNESS AND PATIENT CARE PSYCHOLOGY

WM 340 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This class will provide an introduction to the basic concepts, clinical presentation, and patient assessment and treatment options of common mental health conditions. This course will also include an overview on the boundaries and limits of patient practitioner relationship, fundamentals of effective communication and multicultural sensitivity in establishing a positive professional relationship with patients. Prerequisites: Western Medical Terminology at least one Clinical Theater module or observation; General Psychology.

WESTERN PHARMACOLOGY

WM 360 • 3 Units • 45 Hours

This course is an introduction to the pharmacological basis of therapy in western medicine. It will discuss the therapeutic actions, clinical indications, safety, and side effects of the major drugs in current use today. It will also present some basic physiological mechanisms that are relevant to drug/herb interaction. Prerequisites: Biochemistry, Pathophysiology I & II

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT, PUBLIC HEALTH & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

HISTORY OF MEDICINE

WM 230 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course provides a survey of the history and development of the Western medical system, as well as acupuncture and Chinese medicine, including major historical events and their impact on the development of medical paradigms in the East and the West. Prerequisites: None

PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC HEALTH

WM 420 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course provides training in the principles of public health, including public and community health and disease prevention, public health education, public health alert and a survey of communicable diseases, disease epidemiology and treatment of chemical dependency. Prerequisites: Pathophysiology I-II; at least one Clinical Theater module or observation.

HEALTHCARE LAWS, ETHICS

WM 431 • 1 Units • 15 Hours

This course presents the legal and ethical issues of the health practitioner, with special emphasis on the laws and regulations governing the practice of acupuncture in California, including the relevant OSHA and HIPAA requirements. Prerequisites: Level 2-3 intern.

HEALTHCARE BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

WM 432 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course is designed to present students with the basic concepts and practical knowledge necessary for managing and operating an acupuncture / Traditional Asian Medicine practice in the state of California. The course presents a study of the business aspects of a healthcare practice, including marketing and advertising, strategic and financial planning, and maintenance of records, billing procedures, legal responsibilities, and related topics. Prerequisites: Level 2-3 intern.

SURVEY OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

WM 350 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

This course provides an overview of the various medical/ healthcare systems to enable students to understand the nature and scope of practice of other healthcare practitioners and effectively communicate with patients and other healthcare providers, including nursing, dentistry, clinical psychology, chiropractic, osteopathy, homeopathy, naturopathy, podiatry, and other healthcare professions. Prerequisites: Western Medical Terminology, at least one Clinical Theater module or observation.

BIOMEDICAL ACUPUNCTURE

WM 370 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

This course introduces students to research and evidence-based medicine, knowledge and critique of research methods, knowledge of the academic peer review process and basic skills in biostatistics. Prerequisites: Western Medical Terminology.

MEDICAL WRITING & COMMUNICATION SKILLS

PD 210 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course presents a comprehensive examination of skills essential for writing for publication in medical and healthcare-related journals, papers and blogs. Additional emphasis is placed on communication skills for practitioners as relates to speaking opportunities, medical reporting, website content, social media, patient newsletters, and communication with integrative healthcare professionals. This course will include review of creative non-fiction in medicine. Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Patient Care. *DAcCHM requirement

RESEARCH AND EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE

PD 340 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course introduces the fundamental principles of research and evidence-based medicine, with emphasis on acupuncture / Asian Medicine research. This course also provides an overview to research methodology to enable students to read and critique the medical literature, and a foundation for asking research questions and designing studies to answer these questions. The course also presents the basic processes and current developments in the biomedical perspective of acupuncture / TCM, and discussions around the academic peer review process.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Patient Care.*DAcCHM requirement

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE I – OVERVIEW OF PATIENT CARE SYSTEMS

PD 410 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course presents students with an overview of the health care system in the United States of America, and patient care models in the context of the relevant health care systems. The course also explores the role of Acupuncture / Chinese Herbal Medicine (ACHM) professionals within the current health care systems, and the impact of that role in patient care. Prerequisites: Principles of Public Health, *DAcCHM requirement

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE II – EMERGENCY CARE AND PROCEDURES

PD 420 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course introduces students to emergency care and procedure pertinent to the scope and practice of acupuncture / Asian medicine. The course identifies subjective and objective findings that indicate urgent and non- urgent referral, discusses the legal implications of providing emergency care, and provides the foundation for developing an emergency care plan in a clinical setting. Training will also be provided on key emergency first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures. Prerequisites: Principles of Public Health Western Clinical Medicine I & II. *DAcCHM requirement

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE III – EMERGING COLLABORATIVE CARE PARADIGMS

PD 430 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

This course introduces students to the concept and practice of collaborative care. The course describes, compares, and contrasts common medical and allied health practices, and explores the prevailing and emerging organization, structure and responsibilities of a collaborative health care team. Prerequisites: Principles of Public Health; Western Clinical Medicine I & II. *DAcCHM requirement

PATIENT EDUCATION AND COUNSELING

PD 450 • 1 Units • 15 Hours

This class will provide an introduction to establishing effective communication and understanding between healthcare providers/staff and the patients they serve by focusing on health literacy. Students will learn what health literacy is, how to identify patients who may have low levels of health literacy, and how to best communicate with a patient depending on their level of health literacy. Students will also learn specific tools and strategies to improve their communications with different patients depending on their level of health literacy. The ultimate goal of this improved communication and patient education is better treatment compliance and health outcomes. Prerequisites:, Intro to Clinical Patient Care, Mental Wellness and Patient Care Psychology. *DAcCHM requirement

TAOIST STUDIES

TAOISM I – FUNDAMENTALS OF TAOISM

TO 100 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

This course introduces the Taoist philosophical principles that are the essence of Traditional Chinese Medicine, emphasizing the Taoist approaches to the cultivation of the mind, body and spirit. Prerequisites: None

TAOISM II – FUNDAMENTALS OF NATURAL HEALING

TO 200 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

This course explores the Taoist principles governing natural health and healing. Students will learn and be knowledgeable in the Taoist practices that enhance cultivation of mind, body and spirit. Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Taoism I

TAOISM III – FUNDAMENTALS OF THE HEALTH PRACTITIONER

TO 300 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

This course continues the interactive training in the cultivation of attitudes, strategies and skills essential to becoming an exceptional practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine. This course examines the Taoist perspectives of self- discipline, practitioner-patient communication, problem solving and patient management. Prerequisites: Taoism I & II

QI CULTIVATION

A total of six (6) units of Qi Cultivation courses are required for successful completion of the MAcCHM or DAcCHM program.

FOUNDATIONAL COURSES IN QI CULTIVATION

The Foundational courses in Qi cultivation consists of the following core courses: Self-Healing Qigong (QC 110), Eight Treasures (QC 120) Harmony Tai Chi Chuan Level I (QC 130) Infinichi Qigong Level I (QC 140), and Dao-In Qigong Level 1 (QC 150). Six (6) units are required to graduate from the MAcCHM or DAcCHM program. Students who wish to pursue advanced focused courses in Qi Cultivation must complete at least four (4) foundational units before progressing to the advanced Qi Cultivation courses.

SELF-HEALING QIGONG

QC 110 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

This course establishes the groundwork for TCM movement practices and Taoist Self cultivation, bringing to life the Five Element theory component of the academic curriculum in self-healing exercises. Students begin learning related Yo San family tradition basic practices and Five Element work immediately applicable to healing self while also key to later clinical therapeutics. Prerequisites: None

EIGHT TREASURES I

QC 120 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

Unique to the Yo San heritage, the Eight Treasures is a Qigong form that builds a strong movement ‘vocabulary’ for Qi Cultivation, as well as providing an experiential connection to the study and understanding of acupuncture channels and the circulation of the eight extraordinary vessels. This course, also known as the ‘Little Eight Treasures’, includes coordinated movement and breathing sequences from each of the eight long-form segments of Parts II &

III. Prerequisites: None

HARMONY TAI CHI CHUAN LEVEL I (SHORT FORM)

QC 130 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

Tai Chi Chuan is an ancient moving meditation practice with many mind, body, and spiritual benefits. This course covers the 18-Step Harmony Tai Chi Chuan Short Form, comprised of movements taken from the Harmony Tai Chi Chuan Long Form in the Yo San Heritage. Prerequisites: None

INFINICHI QIGONG LEVEL I

QC 140 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

This is the introductory course in a complete system of medical Qigong, designed to train students developing the energetic abilities of a Qi healing therapist. Using the Yo San family materials, along with standard texts in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Qigong and Chinese body work, it features a progressive, systematic program that nurtures understanding, facilitates skill development, and promotes self-growth. Prerequisites: None

DAO-IN QIGONG LEVEL I

QC 150 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

Dao-In Qigong is a thorough system of body tuning and adjustment accomplished through movement and meditation postures performed while in seated and lying positions. Dao-In Qigong emphasizes moving through rather than holding individual postures. This practice stretches and strengthens the body, balances internal systems and adjusts energy. This is the foundational set of movements and practices drawn from the advanced Dao-In Qigong taught in Levels II and III. Prerequisites: None

CLINICAL EDUCATION

INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PATIENT CARE

CL 100 • 2 Units • 30 Hours

Students will learn legal, ethical, and practical procedures that will prepare them for their clinical internship as well as their future practice as a licensed acupuncturist. At the end of the class, students will understand their duties and responsibilities as acupuncture interns and be able to successfully discharge these duties and responsibility during their clinical internship training. Prerequisites: TCM Diagnosis.

CLINICAL THEATER

CL 310 • 1 Unit • 30 Hours • 2 Units Required (Combination of 150 units of Clinical Theatre and Observation)

This series of clinical observation offers students exposure to acupuncture and Asian Medicine in a clinical setting. Students will have the opportunity to see how TCM theories and diagnostic principles are integrated into clinical practice by observing the entire diagnostic and treatment procedure conducted by experienced, licensed practitioners/faculty. There will also be ample opportunity for review and discussions of cases to further enhance the learning experience. Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Patient Care

CLINICAL OBSERVATION

CL 400 • 1 Unit • 30 Hours • 3 Units Required (Combination of 150 units of Clinical Theatre and Observation)

In this section of the clinical observation curriculum, students will be assigned to work with clinic supervisors, and will be directly observing senior practice interns as well as licensed practitioners in the clinic. Students will acquire the necessary skills and knowledge to begin working directly with patients in the next level of clinical training. Prerequisites: Introduction to Clinical Patient Care

INTEGRATIVE CLINICAL CASE STUDY

CL 611, 711, 811 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours (3 units required)

In this case study series, the focus will be on integrative approach to clinical diagnosis and management of patients. This will be an opportunity for interns to engage in discussions on integrating TCM with Western medical modalities. Prerequisites: Concurrent with Clinical Internship

CLINICAL INTERNSHIP – LEVEL I

CL 600 • 10 Units • 300 Hours (5 Blocks of 60 Hours Each Required)

At Level I clinical internship, student interns will be working under the close supervision of a clinical faculty member to develop the students’ confidence and competence in diagnosing and implementing treatments. Interns will be directly involved in history taking, physical examination, diagnosis, as well as carrying out supervisor approved treatment. Prerequisites: Pass the Pre-Clinical Examination; complete all Clinical Theater and Clinical Observation hours (150 hours); complete all six units of Foundational Qi cultivation courses; Clinical Management; TCM Diagnosis I & II; Herbal Formulas I, II & III; Acupuncture Techniques I & II; Auricular & Scalp Acupuncture; Pathophysiology I & II; Western Physical Assessment; CPR & First Aid; CNT certification

CLINICAL INTERNSHIP – LEVEL II

CL 700 • 8 Units • 240 Hours (4 Blocks of 60 Hours Each Required)

Students will continue to work with patients under direct supervision of the clinical faculty. Students will further develop their clinical assessment, diagnose patients and consult with clinic supervisors in developing an approved treatment and follow-up plan. Students will be supervised by the clinical faculty in the treatment of all patients. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Clinical Internship Levels I and the Level 1 Clinical Phase Assessment

CLINICAL INTERNSHIP – LEVEL III

CL 800 • 8 Units • 240 Hours (4 Blocks of 60 Hours Each Required)

Students will continue to work with patients under minimum supervision from the clinical faculty. Students will independently carry out the entire history intake, clinical assessment and diagnosis process and develop an appropriate treatment and follow-up plan for approval by the clinical faculty. Students will also be expected to instruct patients on appropriate lifestyle modifications and post-treatment care. Students will be supervised by the clinical faculty in the treatment of all patients. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Clinical Internship Level II and the Level 2 Clinical Phase Assessment

CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP

CL 880 • 1 Unit • 60 Hours (1 Block of 60 Hours Required)

Students will have the opportunity to participate at an off-site clinical training program with approved partnership organizations including the Venice Family Clinic’s Simms/Mann Health & Wellness Center, Being Alive Los Angeles, WISE & Healthy Aging, and The Wellness Center at the Historic General Hospital (LAC+USC). Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Clinical Internship Levels I and the Level 1 Clinical Phase Assessment

ADVANCED STUDIES IN TAOISM & QI CULTIVATION (ELECTIVES)

EIGHT TREASURES LEVEL II and LEVEL III

QC 421 and QC 422 • 2 Units Each • 30 Hours Each

The Eight Treasures series provides study of the Eight Treasures Long Form, incorporating portions of the ‘Little Eight Treasures’ into the study and practice of the eight ‘Treasures’ of the long form. Students will continue to incorporate knowledge of meridians and extraordinary vessels as well as the energetics of various acupuncture points into Qigong practice. Eight Treasures II focuses on the first four of the long form ‘Treasures’, while Eight Treasures III focuses on the latter four of the long form ‘Treasures’. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of at least three Foundational Qi Cultivation courses, including Eight Treasures I

HARMONY TAI CHI CHUAN LEVEL II

QC 431 • 1 Unit • 15 Hours

Harmony Tai Chi Chuan balances the energy of the three energy centers of the body. This course covers the 28- Step Harmony Tai Chi Chuan intermediate form, comprised of the first 18 movements of the short form (Level I) plus 10 additional movements (including some basic kicks) taken mostly from the first part (Yin Section) of the Harmony Tai Chi Chuan long form (Level III). Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of at least three Foundational Qi Cultivation courses, including Harmony Tai Chi Chuan Level I

HARMONY TAI CHI CHUAN LEVEL III and LEVEL IV

QC 432 and QC 433 • 2 Units Each • 30 Hours Each

The series of Harmony Tai Chi Chuan Level III and Level IV together presents the philosophy and practice of the Harmony Tai Chi Chuan long form that is part of the Yo San heritage. Level III covers the 58-step Yin Section or first part of the long form which includes movements that are more contracted. Level IV covers the 50-step Yang Section or second part of the long form which includes movements that are more expansive. Harmony Tai Chi Chuan is a style that embodies principles of the Tao Te Ching. Mastery of this form helps one to gain balance, harmony, and an enhanced sensing of Qi that is essential to the acupuncture practitioner. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of at least three Foundational Qi Cultivation courses, including Harmony Tai Chi Chuan Level I

Opportunities for externships, mentorships and preceptorships include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Clinical Internships at Yo San University Blount Community Clinic
  • Clinical Externships at specialized clinics and hospitals in the local area
  • China Externships at universities and hospitals in China
  • Mentorship programs with experienced senior practitioners and faculty in the field
  • Preceptorships programs with focus on education or academic administration
  • Specialty grand rounds